Stanley L. Ruby

His graduate research at Brookhaven Labs first looked to confirm one model for the mechanism of beta decay. Five years later, those results came into conflict with an emerging unified theory of the weak nuclear force. How and why did the experiment go wrong, and what was the role of physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in the chronology of events? Ruby went on to a successful career in the field of Mössbauer spectroscopy, while Wu polished her reputation as the world's greatest experimental physicist. 

Correlation Between Electron and Recoil Nucleus in He-6 Decay

Brice M. Rustad and Stanley L. Ruby
Physical Review
Dec 31 1952
Comment(s): 

First publication of Rustad-Ruby results. Together with Allen-Jentschke, seen as definitive determination of Tensor coupling in GT interactions

Excerpt(s): 

A STUDY of the correlation between the electron and the recoil nucleus in the He6-Li6 decay has been made to determine whether the tensor or axial vector interaction should be retained in the formulation of beta-theory. The remaining interactions, scalar, polar vector, and pseudoscalar, are forbidden for this particular transition on the basis of the allowed ft value of 815~70 seconds' and the nuclear spin change' b,I=1.

Mössbauer Effect in Ferrocyanide

S. L. RUBY , L. M. EPSTEIN, AND K. H. SUN
Review of Scientific Instruments
Mar 18 1960
Comment(s): 

Stan's first Mössbauer paper
the first three-line folded spectrum of 57Fe

Excerpt(s): 

At about this time, the first three-line folded spectrum of 57Fe appeared [29] (see Fig. 5.8, top), which unfolded becomes the standard six-line spectrum so familiar today. This spectrum was produced by a magnetically split (six-line) iron source and a nonmagnetic (single line) ferrocyanide absorber. Essentially simultaneously with this report came the landmark paper of Kistner and Sunyar. — Hanna in the Mössbauer Story

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